How to Implement PULSE for Youth Athletes

Sensor Management and Athlete Workflow

In the team setting, sensor management and the athlete workflow could likely all be the same. This is how I think it could work the best

Sensor Management: Coach handles all sensors

  • Keeps all sensors on a charging station at one time
  • Brings all sensors to each practice
  • Brings all sensors back home / to a docking station to charge
  • Syncs all sensors using the "Roster Transfer Function"

Athlete Workflow

  • Puts on sensor when they put on their cleats
  • Keeps sensor on all practice
  • Takes off sensor after practice and gets it back to the coach responsible for the sensors

Using the Data

Low Time Investment

This method is basically just monitoring throw counts. This would be valuable because it captures not only just pitches off the mound but also warm up pitches, throws from the field, etc. etc.

  • Open up dash and go to the Long Term Trends tab on the left toolbar
  • Click to Day Average tab at the top of the page
  • Adjust the date range you want to look at on the top right of the page
  • Change the Metric drop down to Throw Count
  • Now if you click on an athlete from the list, it will show throw counts over the date range (shown in the picture below)

(1 screenshot of DASH page with different interactive options - focusing on throw counts)

  • This can be used as a very simple check to see if there are athletes who are throwing too much in general, if athletes threw an abnormal amount on a specific day or week, etc. etc.
    • If you see an athlete threw an abnormally high amount of throws in the last week compared to previous weeks you could decide not to have him pitch on a specific weekend

Medium Time Investment

Another option you could pursue is using the same tab in Dash to monitor acute and chronic workloads. To do this you could:

  • Open up dash and go to the Long Term Trends tab on the left toolbar
  • Click to Day Average tab at the top of the page
  • Adjust the date range you want to look at on the top right of the page
  • Start by changing the Metric drop down to Acute:Chronic Workload Ratio. This will show you a ratio comparing the athlete's average workload in the last week to their workload over the last month to see if they are out-working the throwing volume capacity that they have on-ramped to. You don't want this value getting much higher than 1.3. That will look like this

  • You can see that Cliff Holmes's Acute to Chronic workload ratio get's up to 1.8 last week which is shaded red because that means they threw way more that week than they had on ramped to in the month prior
  • In this case, you might want to look more into it and see if they threw way too many throws in one day, if they threw a reasonable amount of throws but just did it in consecutive days without enough rest, if they threw a reasonable amount of throws but they just hadn't on ramped enough, etc. So you might want to look into their chronic workload (average workload over the last month) and their acute workloads (average workload over the last week) or their one day workloads

  • So in this case, you can see that the reason Cliff's Acute to Chronic workload ratio is so high is because he threw a lot in the last week (by looking at the one-day workloads on the bottom pic) and hadn't thrown hardly at all in the last month, so he wasn't in great throwing shape.

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